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Volume: 7
Issue: 10
Date: 25-Oct-99


Table of Contents:

I.    J INFECT DIS: Association of specific subtypes of Borrelia
      burgdorferi with hematogenous dissemination in early Lyme
      disease.
II.   J CLIN MICROBIOL: Isolation and species typing of Lyme
      borreliosis spirochaetes from UK patients with erythema migrans.
III.  J CLIN MICROBIOL: Common ancestry of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu
      lato strains from North America and Europe.
IV.   J CLIN MICROBIOL: Infection with agents of human granulocytic
      ehrlichiosis, lyme disease, and babesiosis in wild white-footed
      mice (Peromyscus leucopus) in Connecticut.
V.    ABOUT THE LYMENET NEWSLETTER


Newsletter:

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                  Volume 7 / Number 10 / 25-OCT-1999
                                INDEX


I.    J INFECT DIS: Association of specific subtypes of Borrelia
     burgdorferi with hematogenous dissemination in early Lyme
     disease.
II.   J CLIN MICROBIOL: Isolation and species typing of Lyme
     borreliosis spirochaetes from UK patients with erythema migrans.
III.  J CLIN MICROBIOL: Common ancestry of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu
     lato strains from North America and Europe.
IV.   J CLIN MICROBIOL: Infection with agents of human granulocytic
     ehrlichiosis, lyme disease, and babesiosis in wild white-footed
     mice (Peromyscus leucopus) in Connecticut.
V.    ABOUT THE LYMENET NEWSLETTER



=====*=====


I.    J INFECT DIS: Association of specific subtypes of Borrelia
     burgdorferi with hematogenous dissemination in early Lyme
     disease.
----------------------------------------------------------------
AUTHORS: Wormser GP, Liveris D, Nowakowski J, Nadelman RB, Cavaliere LF
        McKenna D, Holmgren D, Schwartz I
ORGANIZATION: Division of Infectious Diseases, New York Medical
             College, Westchester Medical Center, Valhalla, NY 10595,
     USA.
REFERENCE: J Infect Dis 1999 Sep;180(3):720-5
ABSTRACT:


To investigate whether genetic diversity of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu
stricto may affect the occurrence of hematogenous dissemination, 104
untreated adults with erythema migrans from a Lyme disease diagnostic
center in Westchester County, New York, were studied. Cultured skin
isolates were classified into 3 groups by a polymerase chain reaction
amplification and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)
method. A highly significant association between infecting RFLP type
in skin and the presence of spirochetemia was found (P<.001). The same
association existed for the presence of multiple erythema migrans
lesions (P=.045), providing clinical corroboration that hematogenous
dissemination is related to the genetic subtype of B. burgdorferi sensu
stricto. There were no significant associations between RFLP type and
seropositivity or clinical symptoms and signs except for a history of
fever and chills (P=.033). These results suggest that specific genetic
subtypes of B. burgdorferi sensu stricto influence disease

pathogenesis. Infection with different subtypes of B. burgdorferi
sensu stricto may help to explain differences in the clinical
presentation of patients with Lyme disease.



=====*=====


II.   J CLIN MICROBIOL: Isolation and species typing of Lyme
     borreliosis spirochaetes from UK patients with erythema migrans.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
AUTHORS: Robertson J, Murdoch S, Foster L, Green S
ORGANIZATION: Lyme Disease Reference Unit, Public Health Laboratory,
             Southampton General Hospital, UK. jnr@soton.ac.uk
REFERENCE: Eur J Epidemiol 1999 May;15(5):499-500
ABSTRACT:


Skin biopsies taken from UK cases of erythema migrans rash were
cultured for Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato. Reverse line blotting
was used to type the infecting genospecies in PCR-positive cultures
and biopsies. B. garinii or B. afzelii was identified in 56% (5/9) of
biopsies/cultures tested. All patients were tested by conventional
serology. PCR confirmed infection in two patients where serological
testing failed to detect antibody.



=====*=====


III.  J CLIN MICROBIOL: Common ancestry of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu
     lato strains from North America and Europe.
---------------------------------------------------------------------
AUTHORS: Postic D, Ras NM, Lane RS, Humair P, Wittenbrink MM,
        Baranton G
ORGANIZATION: Unite de Bacteriologie Moleculaire et Medicale, Institut
             Pasteur, 75724 Paris Cedex 15, France. dpostic@pasteur.fr
REFERENCE: J Clin Microbiol 1999 Sep;37(9):3010-2
ABSTRACT:


Ten atypical European Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (Borrelia spp.)
strains were genetically characterized, and the diversity was compared
to that encountered among related Borrelia spp. from North America.
Phylogenetic analyses of a limited region of the genome and of the
whole genome extend existing knowledge about borrelial diversity
reported earlier in Europe and the United States. Our results accord
with the evidence that North American and European strains may have
a common ancestry.



=====*=====


IV.   J CLIN MICROBIOL: Infection with agents of human granulocytic
     ehrlichiosis, lyme disease, and babesiosis in wild white-footed
     mice (Peromyscus leucopus) in Connecticut.
---------------------------------------------------------------------
AUTHORS: Stafford KC 3rd, Massung RF, Magnarelli LA, Ijdo JW,
        Anderson JF
ORGANIZATION: The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, New
             Haven, Connecticut 06504, USA.
     kirby.stafford@po.state.ct.us
REFERENCE: J Clin Microbiol 1999 Sep;37(9):2887-92
ABSTRACT:


White-footed mice, Peromyscus leucopus, were captured in southern
Connecticut during 1997 and 1998 to determine the prevalence of
infections caused by granulocytic Ehrlichia sp., Borrelia burgdorferi,
and Babesia microti. Of the 50 mice captured and recaptured, 25 of 47
(53.2%) and 23 of 48 (47.9%) contained antibodies to the BDS or NCH-1
Ehrlichia strains, respectively, as determined by indirect fluorescent
antibody (IFA) staining methods. The majority (83.3%) of 48 mice also
contained antibodies to B. burgdorferi, as determined by enzyme-linked
immunosorbent assay. Moreover, 20 of 26 (76.9%) contained antibodies
to B. microti by IFA staining methods. In nested PCR tests using the
16S rRNA gene, the DNA of the human granulocytic ehrlichiosis (HGE)
agent was detected in 17 of 47 mice (36.2%), but only 4 (23.5%) of
these 17 mice were PCR positive at each capture. Antibody-positive
reactions to granulocytic Ehrlichia sp. organisms were detected in
17 of 23 (73. 9%) of the PCR-positive mice. The sequences from PCR

products from nine positive blood samples were identical to the HGE
agent. Ehrlichia spp. were cultured from three of five mice captured
in April 1998, including one that was PCR positive in April 1997. In
addition, 2 of 14 larval Ixodes scapularis pools, which were attached
to two PCR-positive mice, contained DNA of the HGE agent. A high
percentage of white-footed mice are infected or have been infected
naturally by the HGE agent with low-level persistent infection or
frequent reinfection in some individual mice. However, the changes
noted in the presence of DNA and antibodies in repeated blood and
serum samples from individual mice over several months of field
collection suggests that infection with granulocytic Ehrlichia is
transient in most wild



=====*=====


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